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Picture This: Timon Wasilwa And The Other Side Of Dubai

Picture This: Timon Wasilwa And The Other Side Of Dubai

Picture This is a series by creatives, photographers, friends and lovers that belong to the worldwide Biancissimo family. In every episode of this series, one of these talented people will take us on a visual journey of their own. 

Timon Wasilwa is a 19 years old film only photographer from the UK who finds his interest and passion in documenting his travels and all the different cultures and people he meets along his way. His Working Class Dubai series portraits the extreme contrast between the real working class in Dubai and the pictures most of us have in mind when thinking about the towns wealth and lifestyle.

 

Picture This: Timon Wasilwa And The Other Side Of Dubai

With Dubai being a tax-free state, with a thriving economy, it is only natural that it would attract people from all over the world to work. This series captures Dubai’s lower working class; although the money in Dubai is a great deal compared to what they could earn at their origin country; A majority of those photographed may share a bunk bed with another resident working night shifts and sleeping in the day.  A complete contrast from the preconceived typical Dubai lifestyle.

Dubai is a state that some would conclude as made up; with no real history, culture or heritage and only a 15% Emirati population, some would say Dubai is a playground for the tourist population and those with enough money to enjoy the 'finer things in life'. 

Being a photographer based in the UK, it was immediately noticeable that in Dubai the streets were remarkably clean and unoccupied by a homeless population. After researching why I discovered that there is a 0% homeless population; reason being that the true Emirati population are given a home by the government due to them being such a minority and any non-Emirati occupant is sent back to their home country if they are without work. The fear of this eventuality was very evident when being served in various places; instead of the hospitable customer service I was used to in the UK; in a range of cases I was faced with quite a hostile 'there's nothing I can do response' under the consequence of getting in repercussions for going the extra mile.

Dubai in this respect is unlike anywhere else; with the immigrant population living in awful conditions to make money for their family in their origin country.

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